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Article Number
LXKASDT

Deep Thinking

287 pages, hardback with jacket, John Murray Books, 1. edition 2017

€23.45
Incl. 5% Tax, excl. Shipping Cost

Garry Kasparov gives his first public account of his landmark 1997 chess match with the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue, and explains why, twenty years later, he's become convinced that artificial intelligence is good for humans.

In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. It was a watershed moment in the history of technology: machine intelligence had arrived at the point where it could best human intellect.

It wasn't a coincidence that Kasparov became the symbol of man's fight against the machines. Chess has long been the fulcrum in development of machine intelligence; the hoax automaton 'The Turk' in the 18th century and Alan Turing's first chess program in 1952 were two early examples of the quest for machines to think like humans - a talent we measured by their ability to beat their creators at chess. As the pre-eminent chessmaster of the 80s and 90s, it was Kasparov's blessing and his curse to play against each generation's strongest computer champions, contributing to their development and advancing the field.

Like all passionate competitors, Kasparov has taken his defeat and learned from it. He has devoted much energy to devising ways in which humans can partner with machines in order to produce results better than either can achieve alone. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. Ultimately, he's become convinced that by embracing the competition between human and machine intelligence, we can spend less time worrying about being replaced and more thinking of new challenges to conquer.

In this breakthrough book, Kasparov tells his side of the story of Deep Blue for the first time - what it was like to strategize against an implacable, untiring opponent - the mistakes he made and the reasons the odds were against him. But more than that, he tells his story of AI more generally, and how he's evolved to embrace it, taking part in an urgent debate with philosophers worried about human values, programmers creating self-learning neural networks, and engineers of cutting edge robotics.

Biographical Notes

Garry Kasparov is a business speaker, global human rights activist, author and former world chess champion. His keynote lectures and seminars on strategic thinking, achieving peak performance, and tech innovation have been acclaimed in dozens of countries. A frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal, he is the author of two books, How Life Imitates Chess and Winter is Coming, each of which has been translated into more than a dozen languages. He lives in New York.

More Information
Weight 530 g
Manufacturer John Murray Books
Width 16 cm
Height 24,1 cm
Medium Book
Year of Publication 2017
Author Garri Kasparow
Language English
Edition 1
ISBN-13 9781473653504
Pages 287
Binding hardback with jacket

001 Introduction

011 One: The Brain Game

025 Two: Rise of the Chess Machines

041 Three: Human versus Machine

069 Four: What Matters to a Machine?

079 Five: What Makes a Mind

093 Six: Into the Arena

113 Seven: The Deep End

151 Eight: Deeper Blue

165 Nine: The Board Is in Flames!

197 Ten: The Holy Grail

221 Eleven: Human Plus Machine

249 Conclusion: Onward and Upward

261 Acknowledgments

263 Notes

275 Index

287 About the Authors